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The real act of discovery consists not in finding new lands but in seeing with new eyes. Marcel Proust

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The Power of Pull

The Power of Pull

In a changing and increasingly interdependent world, how can businesses use rapid adaptation to stay competitive?

Author(s): John Hagel III, John Seely Brown, Lang Davison

Publisher: Basic Books

Date of publication: 2010

buy this book [amazon.com]


At first glance, The Power of Pull appears to be just another of the many books on new technologies and the future of business in a radically new context, i.e., how should we rethink operating practices in the knowledge economy? But, as they read further, readers will quickly realize that the book covers much more fundamental issues, and specifically the forces that are inexorably driving companies to be more agile and efficient. In a changing and increasingly interdependent world, how can businesses use rapid adaptation to stay competitive? Can business processes still be based on demand forecasts?
The answer offered by the authors is both simple and striking: businesses must imperatively move from a ""push"" model, in which resources are planned and acquired to meet anticipated demand, to a model in which resources are attracted or ""pulled"" when they are most needed. Indeed, since advance planning is no longer relevant or possible, companies must attract required resources when they need them in order to rapidly adapt to changes in the environment. From this simple observation emerges a new three-pronged model, in which companies build extended networks, attract the right resources and talent when needed, and reach new heights of performance by supporting collaboration.
Although this model unfortunately remains very theoretical and is not sufficiently supported with real-world examples, the analysis is nonetheless enticing. The authors put their finger on some major trends which are strongly impacting companies, particularly in terms of the growing power of individuals within organizations, and they wisely suggest that companies cash in on these trends, rather than resigning themselves to them.